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Rachel Lu

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Rachel Lu is a co-founder of Tea Leaf Nation. Rachel traces her ancestry to Southern China. She spent much of her childhood memorizing Chinese poetry. After long stints in New York, New Haven and Cambridge, she has returned to China to bear witness to its great transformation. She is currently based in China.

Articles by Author

A Turning Point for Hong Kong

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HONG KONG — Future generations may well commemorate Sept. 28, 2014 in the history of Hong Kong as the day when the famously apolitical city turned unmistakably political. Tens of thousands of protesters, calling for “true democracy” — that …

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Love Country = Love Party?

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China’s ruling Communist Party has a message for Chinese citizens: You are for us, or you are against us. That’s the takeaway from a widely discussed Sept. 10 opinion piece in pro-party tabloid Global Times, in which …

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For Alibaba’s Small Business Army, a Narrowing Path

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Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba plans an initial public offering (IPO) on the New York Stock Exchange expected to raise approximately $20 billion as early as Sept. 18, celebration is surely in order for the company’s executives. But for millions of …

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Check Out the Communist Party’s Account on WeChat

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HONG KONG — It’s a growth story that would make many Silicon Valley venture capitalists swoon: a once-tiny, secretive group of 13 members blooming into a network of around 86 million, plus a killer app that no other competitor …

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Is China Losing its ‘Last Fair Path’ to Prosperity?

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From the look of things, it’s getting harder to be a cheater in China.The antifraud mechanisms used during China’s most recent annual college entrance exam, commonly known as the gaokao, have been compared to counter-terrorism measures. The parallel …

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Who Lectures China’s Leaders?

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The Communist Party Politburo is the de facto power center of China. Its members — currently 23 men and two women — make the policies that directly affect 1.3 billion Chinese citizens, and, indirectly, hundreds of millions …

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