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David Wertime

Breaking New Ground: A Live, Interactive Online Discussion on U.S.-China Relations

Dialogue. Understanding. Connecting people from around the world to talk about meaningful subjects. That’s what Tea Leaf Nation is all about, and so we are thrilled to partner with the good folks at ChinaDialogue.net to present “China-U.S.: A live discussion on elections, energy and climate change.” This live, online, interactive discussion will be accessible on this site and on ChinaDialogue.net, and will take place from Tuesday morning, October 30 (9 o’clock a.m. Eastern time, 6 o’clock a.m. Pacific time) to Wednesday morning, October 31 (10 o’clock a.m. Eastern time, 7 o’clock a.m. Pacific time).

The timing, we believe, couldn’t be better. U.S. President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney are neck and neck as they hurtle toward a November 6 election. China is also preparing for a much-anticipated handover of leadership on November 8. It’s an appropriate juncture to discuss the relationship between the U.S. and China, as well as their respective stances on climate change, clean tech, and the environment. 

This live dialogue is organized in partnership with ChinaDialogue.net, a site “devoted to the publication of high quality, bilingual information, direct dialogue and the search for solutions to our shared environmental challenges.” We encourage our readers to tune in live, and submit questions before or during the discussion. For those who miss it, a record of the talk will be available on this site afterwards.

The live discussion will include two live, hour-long Q&A sessions with two distinct panels of highly regarded experts. You will be able to post your questions and comments directly to them through TeaLeafNation, or via Twitter (hashtag: #uschinadialogue). Here are the details: 

Session 1: Tuesday October 30, 9-10 a.m. Eastern time (that’s 6 o’clock a.m. Pacific time, 9 o’clock p.m. Beijing time) on Leadership and climate change 

Themes: Public awareness on climate change and its influence on policy; policy challenges for U.S. and Chinese leaders moving forward; likely policy under Obama/Romney; how the U.S. and China deal with each other in their public rhetoric.

Expert panel: Martin Bunzl, Founding Director, Rutgers Initiative on Climate and Society; Wang Tao, Resident Scholar, Energy and Climate Program, Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy; Ed Grumbine, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ross Perlin, writer and linguist 

Session 2: Wednesday October 31, 9-10 a.m. Eastern time (that’s 6 o’clock a.m. Pacific time, 9 o’clock p.m. Beijing time) on Clean tech & U.S.-China cooperation

Themes: Emissions and energy goals and implementation of the 12th five year plan; state of play for clean tech deployment and financing; international trade negotiations; green jobs; market perceptions of clean tech. Opportunities for collaboration on climate policy and technology; international structures and frameworks that can foster collaboration.

Expert panel: Jennifer Morgan, Director, Climate and Energy Program, World Resources Institute; Yang Fuqiang, Senior Advisor on Climate and Energy, NRDC China Program; Angel Hsu, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 

Members of the public are encouraged to post comments and questions as the debate continues. So please join us for both sessions either to follow the discussion or to make your own contributions. 

You can also email us questions ahead of the debate with the subject line “live dialogue.” If you’re a climate and energy expert and would like to join the panel, please also email us. (Our thanks go in particular to Charles Zhu, who has spearheaded organization on the TLN end.)

We look forward to seeing you online!

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David Wertime

David is the co-founder and co-editor of Tea Leaf Nation. He first encountered China as a Peace Corps Volunteer in 2001 and has lived and worked in Fuling, Chongqing, Beijing, and Hong Kong. He is a ChinaFile fellow at the Asia Society and an associate fellow at the Truman National Security Project.