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David Wertime

Chinese Netizens Say Time To "Clean Up" Foreign "Trash"

Foreigners, watch out. Beijing police have sent a shot across the bow of the city’s estimated 120,000 non-Chinese residents, some of whom are in the country illegally. After a video of a British man apparently sexually assaulting a Chinese woman caught fire on Weibo, Beijing police have announced a campaign to “clean up” (清理) unwelcome outsiders (Chinese).

Beijing police want to see more of these

Specifically, the police have announced they will go after foreign nationals who are 1) in the country illegally, 2) remaining illegally, or 3) working illegally. They call such foreigners “san fei” foreigners, or 三非外国人, meaning “three illegals.” 

Clouds on the horizon

Reading through a small sample of the 114,000 comments to the recent news, Tea Leaf Nation found netizens roundly and angrily supportive of the measure. Many argued this step was “overdue” and “better late than never” (亡羊补牢). Many from other cities chimed in to call for similar measures in Dalian, Shanghai, and Guangzhou.

The overall tone of discussion will surely be deeply troubling to anyone who has ever had to be an “outsider.” @魚魚桑 honed in on, and lauded, the dangerous semantics employed by Beijing police: “‘Clean up’…This is really the right word to use. I feel like it’s cleaning up trash from the street.”

Others piled on, in many cases disregarding the original distinction between illegal foreigners and legal foreigners. @Bob_慕小落 wrote, “Clean slowly, so that not a single one is left.” But @味同烂嚼 wanted speed: “We should thoroughly clean up, hurry up and clean up, I don’t want to see these disgusting people anymore.” @山哥SANGER opined, “White-skinned pigs [白皮猪], black devils [黑鬼], sticks [棒子, a slur referring to Koreans], devils [鬼子], Southeast Asian monkeys [东南亚猴子] and other kinds of foreign trash should all be swept out the door.”

A man from Xinjiang. He can enter Beijing sans visa

Some netizens did not seem to know what “foreigner” actually meant. A number of users asked that people from Xinjiang, a (sometimes reluctant) Chinese border province, be expelled from the capital. As @阿琦爱ZHOULINBO wrote, “Xinjiang people are the scariest, I hate the Xinjiang [people] the most.” When one user challenged her view, she simply wrote, “I don’t need to explain.”

A few cooler heads, but not prevailing

Others chastised what one user (@公益小杨) called the “xenophobic passion” of fellow netizens. She tried to interject: “Kicking out the foreigners doesn’t mean China has won, if one day Chinese people were kicked out from other countries as ‘foreigners,’ would you all be happy?” @若讷小东邪 cautioned, “I hope everyone does not start to see the legal immigrants and tourists in a new light.” 

Young American Jason Loose, sharing his fries

That may already be too late. While it would be comforting to conclude the vitriol spewed online represents a minority, if this is the case cooler heads have spent a great deal of time sitting sideline. One culprit behind such anti-foreigner sentiment is the sense that foreigners have been given special treatment for too long. As @Ren类已经无法阻止我了 asked ironically, “Has Beijing begun to pay attention to we second-class citizens?” @Mantarine agreed, “Chinese have been too tolerant of foreigners … some foreigners’ conduct has really been over the top.”

A minority of foreigners have doubtless taken advantage of a country that has often afforded certain outsiders un-earned leeway. This lax regime, not to mention plentiful job opportunities for those who can teach English, has surely attracted some who for whatever reason lack good prospects in their home countries. (@恢复第一人格的阿燕 would call them “defective and unsaleable products.”) Yet Chinese social media just recently heated up with discussions of two relatively idealistic foreigners, one a young American man who shared food with an elderly beggar, the other a Brazilian man who was the only one (including two nearby guards) to intervene in a purse snatching. Why should the bad blot out the good?

Explaining the anger

This image continues to reverberate

The outburst of anger at Beijing’s foreigners may be linked to the recent rise of nationalism in some corners of China’s blogosphere. China and the Philippines have recently been purportedly sharpening swords as the ownership spat over the Scarborough Shoal in the South China Sea risks metastasizing into international armed conflict. With such tensions just below the surface, it is a particularly inapt time to come across as an overbearing foreigner in China’s capital.

Coded language has also played a role. The announcement’s targeting so-called “three illegals” (as well as a hotline to report them) implied Beijing is crawling with serial foreign lawbreakers, even though it would actually be difficult for a given foreigner to break all three of the cited laws him or herself. The stated need for a “clean up” employed language of disgust, always fertile ground for hatred. These linguistic feints not only set the tone of discussion, they draw in netizens already inclined to vent their spleen.

There’s no question that Beijing authorities can, and should, enforce the law. For their part, foreigners in China would do well to remember that they are ultimately guests who should be on their best behavior, not their worst. At the same time, it is incumbent on each netizen to decide whether to react to their guests with viciousness or grace. Weibo remains China’s premier platform for free speech and debate, affording netizens a level of unprecedented freedom to project their views around the globe with the push of a button. With this power, it must be said, comes responsibility. 

[Correction: A previous version of this article said that the number of foreigners in Beijing was estimated to be 200,000. That number should have been 120,000. We're sorry for the error.]

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David Wertime

David is the co-founder and co-editor of Tea Leaf Nation. He first encountered China as a Peace Corps Volunteer in 2001 and has lived and worked in Fuling, Chongqing, Beijing, and Hong Kong. He is a ChinaFile fellow at the Asia Society and an associate fellow at the Truman National Security Project.
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  • Ulywang

    Don’t you “China watchers”ever get tired trying to read and make sense of all those Chinese netizens’ online comments? Yeah it’s a reflection of what “the people” think and how they may one day act, blahblah, but if you haven’t got the sense by now that these are mostly just a bunch of frustrated, bored young people blowing off steam and moaning for nothing, then there is something wrong with your China watching methodology. 
    How many times have they REALLY, I mean really, influenced Chinese policy making? 

    • David Wertime

      Thanks for your comment, Ulywang. Whether netizen sentiment on any given topic is in fact representative or “mainstream” is a question we often ask. Han Han would probably agree with you–that it’s just people blowing off steam, who won’t do anything about what they write. Then again, it’s the best proxy available to get a sense of what folks in China are thinking. And I suspect that their opinions do have an effect, even if the government won’t admit it. The overturning of Wu Ying’s death sentence is one possible example (but we’ll never know for sure). A better question might be, “How often does citizen sentiment influence policy making in China?” If the answer is quite a lot, then social media’s an important tool. If the answer is “not much,” that’s too bad but suggests that social may still provide valuable information to those who _do_ want to know (China watchers, etc.). And who knows, once in a while there may be real “grassroots” influence. One things for sure, a lot of eyes are on Chinese social media, and as we reported recently some of those eyes are government workers and government officials.

      • Ulywang

        In the Wu Ying case though, Chinese and foreign press mostly focused on the voices of leading academics, economists and lawyers ( the “elite”) calling for leniency, but who paid attention to the thousands more blood-thirsty commentators demanding instant death penalty? That’s why these things are often misleading and deceiving. 

    • SShao

      Because in a country with no guarantee on freedom of speech, anything said by ordinary citizens are not seriously considered by the government.

    • Rushmanm

      If you remove all countries borders and walked around the world, you would not know what country you are in. The one thing that would not change is that you will meet both good and bad people everywhere you travel and the good people should always work together to get rid of the bad no matter where it is. We should all want a common good,and it is not right for women or anyone to be treated with abuse or disrespect  no matter where they happen to be.

  • Ulywang

    Don’t you “China watchers”ever get tired trying to read and make sense of all those Chinese netizens’ online comments? Yeah it’s a reflection of what “the people” think and how they may one day act, blahblah, but if you haven’t got the sense by now that these are mostly just a bunch of frustrated, bored young people blowing off steam and moaning for nothing, then there is something wrong with your China watching methodology. 
    How many times have they REALLY, I mean really, influenced Chinese policy making? 

    • David Wertime

      Thanks for your comment, Ulywang. Whether netizen sentiment on any given topic is in fact representative or “mainstream” is a question we often ask. Han Han would probably agree with you–that it’s just people blowing off steam, who won’t do anything about what they write. Then again, it’s the best proxy available to get a sense of what folks in China are thinking. And I suspect that their opinions do have an effect, even if the government won’t admit it. The overturning of Wu Ying’s death sentence is one possible example (but we’ll never know for sure). A better question might be, “How often does citizen sentiment influence policy making in China?” If the answer is quite a lot, then social media’s an important tool. If the answer is “not much,” that’s too bad but suggests that social may still provide valuable information to those who _do_ want to know (China watchers, etc.). And who knows, once in a while there may be real “grassroots” influence. One things for sure, a lot of eyes are on Chinese social media, and as we reported recently some of those eyes are government workers and government officials.

      • Ulywang

        In the Wu Ying case though, Chinese and foreign press mostly focused on the voices of leading academics, economists and lawyers ( the “elite”) calling for leniency, but who paid attention to the thousands more blood-thirsty commentators demanding instant death penalty? That’s why these things are often misleading and deceiving. 

    • SShao

      Because in a country with no guarantee on freedom of speech, anything said by ordinary citizens are not seriously considered by the government.

    • Rushmanm

      If you remove all countries borders and walked around the world, you would not know what country you are in. The one thing that would not change is that you will meet both good and bad people everywhere you travel and the good people should always work together to get rid of the bad no matter where it is. We should all want a common good,and it is not right for women or anyone to be treated with abuse or disrespect  no matter where they happen to be.

      • un-think

        not the point–deflecting the issue. bad things happen everywhere-you cant blame foreigners for it. Chinese should take a long hard look at themselves and start punishing corruption, slave trafficking, earth destruction causing widespread cancers–tantamount to infanticide and genocide–clean up the damn water and air. People have right to breathe in any country.

  • Gerard

    This kind of anger can easily get out of hand. Yes the foreign drunk devil assaulting a girl is a bad example just like the African drug dealers in Beijing. I hate these scenes. Are the netizens aware of how Chinese themselves misbehave, fight, assault others, get pissed drunk? Especially the anti-social young rich folks prove a fine example of China at its best. After 18 years in China I can say I have done more for the country, employed more people, did more charitable work than all the grumpy netizens together. The police should understand they are playing with fire. If they announce nothing and just start enforcing the laws that would be fine but they are creating trouble for foreign workers.  

    • Ulywang

      If you have been in China that long and know the people so well, you should also know those rabid comments online don’t have much real bearing on the thoughts and behavior of those Chinese around you. It’s easy to cry wolf in situations like this anywhere in the world, but an outrageous case like the Brit brute and angry online voices rarely translate into a nationwide xenophobic trend. Again, you should already know that.  

    • Lucas

      perfectly said. Thank you.

    • http://theworldaccordingtowoman.wordpress.com/ Woman

      Thank-you!!!! 

      It is strange when the shoe is on the other foot many people both Chinese and foreigners forget that we are all like the other. We have our good and our bad in each of us. 

      Fantastic comment!!! 

    • Bleh

      The truth is, everything is different when it comes to foreigners. Not only in China, but *every* country in the world. You could be as stupid as you want as an American citizen in America, but if a Chinese behaves the same way it means no green card n get the fok out. The rule works both ways, I don’t see the issue here.

  • Gerard

    This kind of anger can easily get out of hand. Yes the foreign drunk devil assaulting a girl is a bad example just like the African drug dealers in Beijing. I hate these scenes. Are the netizens aware of how Chinese themselves misbehave, fight, assault others, get pissed drunk? Especially the anti-social young rich folks prove a fine example of China at its best. After 18 years in China I can say I have done more for the country, employed more people, did more charitable work than all the grumpy netizens together. The police should understand they are playing with fire. If they announce nothing and just start enforcing the laws that would be fine but they are creating trouble for foreign workers.  

    • Ulywang

      If you have been in China that long and know the people so well, you should also know those rabid comments online don’t have much real bearing on the thoughts and behavior of those Chinese around you. It’s easy to cry wolf in situations like this anywhere in the world, but an outrageous case like the Brit brute and angry online voices rarely translate into a nationwide xenophobic trend. Again, you should already know that.  

      • un-think

        you are wrong. people use the internet to say what they can say and are too cowardly too say in public. The hatred is overflowing. I have students changing their ‘English; names simply because it sounds to Japanese. They openly curse the Japanese in class and applaud Americas nuclear bombs mass-murdering hundreds of thousands. This is openly said in public. Burning and Japanese cars–this is tolerated and acceptable by many–quietly if not violently. To simply ignore the rhetoric online is like denying your reflection in the mirror.

        However, I wonder how much of their hate for foreigners of all kinds non-Han, is really just a deflection of their hatred for the government and themselves–any excuse to vent and blow off steam–because they cant rally against the government and they cant rant against the government or themselves without looking like unpatriotic self-loathing foreign devils. Perhaps much of the anger is just anger at themselves. And the government loves to use foreigners as a distraction—don’t look behind the curtain–look at those filthy white pigs and your neighbors over the pond.

    • Lucas

      perfectly said. Thank you.

    • http://theworldaccordingtowoman.wordpress.com/ Woman

      Thank-you!!!! 

      It is strange when the shoe is on the other foot many people both Chinese and foreigners forget that we are all like the other. We have our good and our bad in each of us. 

      Fantastic comment!!! 

    • Bleh

      The truth is, everything is different when it comes to foreigners. Not only in China, but *every* country in the world. You could be as stupid as you want as an American citizen in America, but if a Chinese behaves the same way it means no green card n get the fok out. The rule works both ways, I don’t see the issue here.

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  • Carlos

    The new social taxes (48%) aimed at foreigners was not working fast enough, I guess.

  • Carlos

    The new social taxes (48%) aimed at foreigners was not working fast enough, I guess.

  • http://blog.chinatravel.net/ Miller

    It’s a real shame the government hasn’t matured past Maoist-era-sounding slogans.  That angle on this story wasn’t one that had occurred to me before you mentioned it.

  • http://blog.chinatravel.net/ Miller

    It’s a real shame the government hasn’t matured past Maoist-era-sounding slogans.  That angle on this story wasn’t one that had occurred to me before you mentioned it.

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  • Han

    We already have our problem with homegrown criminals. Why should China need more of the same from foreigners?

  • Han

    We already have our problem with homegrown criminals. Why should China need more of the same from foreigners?

  • don

    The actual numbers of foreigners living in China is extremely small compared to other advanced countries; according to the data on this site, Beijing’s foreign population is 0.005% of the city. Whether young hot-heads influence policy or no, such pronouncements from the government surely cannot add to the comfort level of the many honest and hard-working foreigners now living here. It is one thing for some idiot journalist to spout off, or for web-bloggers to posture, but quite another when government officials announce a “clean-up”. Whatever criminal activity exists in China, surely the foreign culprits are a miniscule fraction of the whole. 

  • don

    The actual numbers of foreigners living in China is extremely small compared to other advanced countries; according to the data on this site, Beijing’s foreign population is 0.005% of the city. Whether young hot-heads influence policy or no, such pronouncements from the government surely cannot add to the comfort level of the many honest and hard-working foreigners now living here. It is one thing for some idiot journalist to spout off, or for web-bloggers to posture, but quite another when government officials announce a “clean-up”. Whatever criminal activity exists in China, surely the foreign culprits are a miniscule fraction of the whole. 

    • un-think

      yeas, exactly–too may apologists on this site. One cannot ignore government rhetoric such as ‘clean up’–the language of genocide and hatred in any country–and when the government is saying it ti is certainly a reflection of the hostility in the streets–maybe not a majority but a growing and ever-present significant population and a strong thread in Chinese culture. But when the government backs it with such rhetoric you have trouble–they are essentially giving the green light for all things xenophobic including car burning. Once again, don’t look behind the curtain…look at hose boogeyman–they are responsible for your problems–it cant be YOU.

  • - -

    well, from china to america, ignorance and xenophobia are thriving.  it’s always easy to blame your problems on “those nasty immigrants”.

  • - -

    well, from china to america, ignorance and xenophobia are thriving.  it’s always easy to blame your problems on “those nasty immigrants”.

    • un-think

      because fascism is on the rise in a ll countries–and with it always bigotry

  • sky

    America should start cleaning, there are also many many people illegals in large cities and small towns. Illegals enter into America without papers than want benefits, Obama is lifting restriction before an elections on illegals to that he can get the hispanic vote! A President should not take this upon himself for his benefit but let the people of America vote on these issues, Anyone is welcome in America if you follow rules and do things right. Illegals enter the country without papers already enter breaking laws!
    In Japan you cannot be a citizen even if you are born there if your father is non Japanese. He has to be a native Japanese, this control citizenship and illegals. We do not have to be so harsh but a baby born in the USA should not become a citizen unless parents have legal papers. Our laws were made when America did not have a big population, and we needed people for this vast country. Laws have to be updated. Liberals will comment on this I know as a fact or illegals. Remember all are welcome in the USA, but follow the law and rules for immigration!

    • eeeee

      Do you know the immigration rules?

  • sky

    America should start cleaning, there are also many many people illegals in large cities and small towns. Illegals enter into America without papers than want benefits, Obama is lifting restriction before an elections on illegals to that he can get the hispanic vote! A President should not take this upon himself for his benefit but let the people of America vote on these issues, Anyone is welcome in America if you follow rules and do things right. Illegals enter the country without papers already enter breaking laws!
    In Japan you cannot be a citizen even if you are born there if your father is non Japanese. He has to be a native Japanese, this control citizenship and illegals. We do not have to be so harsh but a baby born in the USA should not become a citizen unless parents have legal papers. Our laws were made when America did not have a big population, and we needed people for this vast country. Laws have to be updated. Liberals will comment on this I know as a fact or illegals. Remember all are welcome in the USA, but follow the law and rules for immigration!

    • eeeee

      Do you know the immigration rules?

  • sky

    when I first read the headliner ” clean foreign trash” I first thought , junk food. I thought China was going to be the first country to clean out western fast food, which is making kids fat!

    • un-think

      i thought they were blaming westerners for their litter. do you see whats underlying all of this–what everyone knows–Chinese blame everyone else but themselves for their problems. its always been this way.

  • sky

    when I first read the headliner ” clean foreign trash” I first thought , junk food. I thought China was going to be the first country to clean out western fast food, which is making kids fat!

    • un-think

      i thought they were blaming westerners for their litter. do you see whats underlying all of this–what everyone knows–Chinese blame everyone else but themselves for their problems. its always been this way.

  • MSS

    Great article!

  • MSS

    Great article!

  • nandro

    The anger towards foreigners is humorous given that the entire economic development of China over the last 20 years is based heavily on opening to “foreign” influnece and “foreign” technology, expertise, education, etc. China would still be an unbelievably poor nation barely able to feed itself if it weren’t for “foreigners.”

    • un-think

      that’s why they hate us–a reflection of the shame they harbor for themselves

  • nandro

    The anger towards foreigners is humorous given that the entire economic development of China over the last 20 years is based heavily on opening to “foreign” influnece and “foreign” technology, expertise, education, etc. China would still be an unbelievably poor nation barely able to feed itself if it weren’t for “foreigners.”

    • un-think

      that’s why they hate us–a reflection of the shame they harbor for themselves

  • Roxanne Coffelt

    This is a very good article, and a different perspective. When I lived in China, I was sometimes treated worse, but usually better. I didn’t take advantage, and treated people with respect. I also taught my kids that every where they went they represented their country. That being said, people are the same no matter their race, and there are always a few bad ones.

  • Roxanne Coffelt

    This is a very good article, and a different perspective. When I lived in China, I was sometimes treated worse, but usually better. I didn’t take advantage, and treated people with respect. I also taught my kids that every where they went they represented their country. That being said, people are the same no matter their race, and there are always a few bad ones.

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  • un-think

    ‘clean up’ is the kind of language that leads to ‘ethnic cleansing’–genocide. China has a history of hating foreigners and periodically booting them from the country. Their open and shut policy tends to go in cycles. It’s only a matter of time before they descend into maniac hatred of all things non-Han. And the reasons for such bad behavior are never reasonable or logical–just knee jerk reactions with replies such as ‘i dont need to explain’–this seems to be the dominant culture in China–’i don’t need to explain’ from top to bottom in all aspects of life–the hallmark of a totalitarian anti-human society. There are wonderful people in china but they are bullied and silenced and marginalized and have no freedom of expression.

    Some people teach because teaching is the noblest profession on earth–the equivalent of planting a tree–it will provide shade for hundreds of years. What other professions can boast such power. Capitalism creates animosity, division, contempt, envy, and promotes inhuman actions. So business is not noble or uniting. What is a business man without a teacher? What is the truth without a library? What is a journalist under the heel of a corporation or the PRC? Teachers are often writers, intellectuals, artists, the creative wheels of society…there are no jobs in the west because fascism dominates the social paradigm and the corporate-aristocracy has exported all the jobs to China and other third-world nations (3rd world in mind and spirit) to exploit slave-labor at the behest of its authoritarian government–willing partners in exploiting its own people. As for teaching English–Chinese are not qualified–teachers are not taking anyone’s jobs–they are filling a vacuum. There are few Chinese who have the skills and knowledge to teach English with any credibility–good for basic levels and standardized exams–but they are not really doing well in that area either because students simply cant write or understand the exams or critical thinking-western thinking. They need native speakers, qualified teachers–especially with English backgrounds. If i am learning Chinese I want a Chinese teacher. If i am learning Kung Fu, i want Bruce lee not Jackie Chan. In the west, most students still go to school to study humanities–philosophy, sociology, linguistics, history, writing, literature–something China has none of–but there is no jobs in the humanities–except teaching. So English teachers in China are doing exactly what they trained for–they are not failures–they are going where the jobs are and building society–teachers are the foundation of any good society–the humanities are the bedrock of society–without humanities we are just automatons–. America wont create jobs–it fires teachers and cuts their pay in half because fascist hate education–they want a standardized work force like China. English teachers are professionals that should be highly regarded. Its high time people start questioning the morality and the character of Chinese students who cant and wont learn–who despise learning, and refuse to open their mind to anything non-Han. Don’t blame the teachers–blame the students and a culture of apathy, obedience, and conformity, a culture where individual expression is crushed. The universities in China are sad sad institutions that roll out automated non-thinking drones–the most brainwashed people in China. You want to find creativity and non-conformist thinking in China–don’t look in the schools. Look somewhere else. Despite stereotypes of the obedient student, Chinese university students have little respect for teachers or classmates and no empathy for them either (obedient only to administrative drones waking them on the head all day). They spit in class, pick their nose, play video games or watch movies while the teacher is talking, laughing with ear buds and taking phone calls in class–when politely asked to refrain they consistently ignore the request. When asked simple questions or thought provoking questions they stare like deer in the headlights unwilling to break conformity scoffing at the teacher, rolling eyes, heaving huge sighs because they are asked to think or respect the student next to them. It’s very very hard to teach people who don’t care, have NO curiosity about anything and no passion. Pop music and NBA is all they care about. Ive had students tell me they want to go abroad–anywhere–just so they can feel something. So what about all the students and the rich who are fleeing china? Perhaps, the truth is, these hatizens resent themselves and loathe themselves. And perhaps that’s why so many jump out of windows–and the authorities insist on covering it up. perhaps they hate themselves for being cowards–for not standing up to injustice when they see it, for allowing China to stagnant in pollution and litter and inhumanity–they don’t blame themselves–they blame the other. they deflect their own shortcomings on to the other. Classic bigotry. and it leads to rivers of blood every time. because they fail to take responsibility for themselves and their own country. no sense of community. Bound only by a dark ribbon of hate. In a time of no heroes…

  • un-think

    ‘clean up’ is the kind of language that leads to ‘ethnic cleansing’–genocide. China has a history of hating foreigners and periodically booting them from the country. Their open and shut policy tends to go in cycles. It’s only a matter of time before they descend into maniac hatred of all things non-Han. And the reasons for such bad behavior are never reasonable or logical–just knee jerk reactions with replies such as ‘i dont need to explain’–this seems to be the dominant culture in China–’i don’t need to explain’ from top to bottom in all aspects of life–the hallmark of a totalitarian anti-human society. There are wonderful people in china but they are bullied and silenced and marginalized and have no freedom of expression.

    Some people teach because teaching is the noblest profession on earth–the equivalent of planting a tree–it will provide shade for hundreds of years. What other professions can boast such power. Capitalism creates animosity, division, contempt, envy, and promotes inhuman actions. So business is not noble or uniting. What is a business man without a teacher? What is the truth without a library? What is a journalist under the heel of a corporation or the PRC? Teachers are often writers, intellectuals, artists, the creative wheels of society…there are no jobs in the west because fascism dominates the social paradigm and the corporate-aristocracy has exported all the jobs to China and other third-world nations (3rd world in mind and spirit) to exploit slave-labor at the behest of its authoritarian government–willing partners in exploiting its own people. As for teaching English–Chinese are not qualified–teachers are not taking anyone’s jobs–they are filling a vacuum. There are few Chinese who have the skills and knowledge to teach English with any credibility–good for basic levels and standardized exams–but they are not really doing well in that area either because students simply cant write or understand the exams or critical thinking-western thinking. They need native speakers, qualified teachers–especially with English backgrounds. If i am learning Chinese I want a Chinese teacher. If i am learning Kung Fu, i want Bruce lee not Jackie Chan. In the west, most students still go to school to study humanities–philosophy, sociology, linguistics, history, writing, literature–something China has none of–but there is no jobs in the humanities–except teaching. So English teachers in China are doing exactly what they trained for–they are not failures–they are going where the jobs are and building society–teachers are the foundation of any good society–the humanities are the bedrock of society–without humanities we are just automatons–. America wont create jobs–it fires teachers and cuts their pay in half because fascist hate education–they want a standardized work force like China. English teachers are professionals that should be highly regarded. Its high time people start questioning the morality and the character of Chinese students who cant and wont learn–who despise learning, and refuse to open their mind to anything non-Han. Don’t blame the teachers–blame the students and a culture of apathy, obedience, and conformity, a culture where individual expression is crushed. The universities in China are sad sad institutions that roll out automated non-thinking drones–the most brainwashed people in China. You want to find creativity and non-conformist thinking in China–don’t look in the schools. Look somewhere else. Despite stereotypes of the obedient student, Chinese university students have little respect for teachers or classmates and no empathy for them either (obedient only to administrative drones waking them on the head all day). They spit in class, pick their nose, play video games or watch movies while the teacher is talking, laughing with ear buds and taking phone calls in class–when politely asked to refrain they consistently ignore the request. When asked simple questions or thought provoking questions they stare like deer in the headlights unwilling to break conformity scoffing at the teacher, rolling eyes, heaving huge sighs because they are asked to think or respect the student next to them. It’s very very hard to teach people who don’t care, have NO curiosity about anything and no passion. Pop music and NBA is all they care about. Ive had students tell me they want to go abroad–anywhere–just so they can feel something. So what about all the students and the rich who are fleeing china? Perhaps, the truth is, these hatizens resent themselves and loathe themselves. And perhaps that’s why so many jump out of windows–and the authorities insist on covering it up. perhaps they hate themselves for being cowards–for not standing up to injustice when they see it, for allowing China to stagnant in pollution and litter and inhumanity–they don’t blame themselves–they blame the other. they deflect their own shortcomings on to the other. Classic bigotry. and it leads to rivers of blood every time. because they fail to take responsibility for themselves and their own country. no sense of community. Bound only by a dark ribbon of hate. In a time of no heroes…

  • http://www.ridingthetiger.org/ William van Nostrand

    The Chinese have every right to dictate their own economic, cultural, and domestic policies. This includes the regulation of immigration. As a Westerner, I just wish that the West would have he guts to do the same thing.

  • http://www.ridingthetiger.org/ William van Nostrand

    The Chinese have every right to dictate their own economic, cultural, and domestic policies. This includes the regulation of immigration. As a Westerner, I just wish that the West would have he guts to do the same thing.

  • Mary

    Kick Devil yellow mao communist chinese idiots out of the Western World, Europe and America, and you Chinese go back to rot in your shithole of a country. Bye please! go back to China! Leave!

  • un-think

    you are wrong. people use the internet to say what they can say and are too cowardly too say in public. The hatred is overflowing. I have students changing their ‘English; names simply because it sounds to Japanese. They openly curse the Japanese in class and applaud Americas nuclear bombs mass-murdering hundreds of thousands. This is openly said in public. Burning and Japanese cars–this is tolerated and acceptable by many–quietly if not violently. To simply ignore the rhetoric online is like denying your reflection in the mirror.

    However, I wonder how much of their hate for foreigners of all kinds non-Han, is really just a deflection of their hatred for the government and themselves–any excuse to vent and blow off steam–because they cant rally against the government and they cant rant against the government or themselves without looking like unpatriotic self-loathing foreign devils. Perhaps much of the anger is just anger at themselves. And the government loves to use foreigners as a distraction—don’t look behind the curtain–look at those filthy white pigs and your neighbors over the pond.

  • un-think

    yeas, exactly–too may apologists on this site. One cannot ignore government rhetoric such as ‘clean up’–the language of genocide and hatred in any country–and when the government is saying it ti is certainly a reflection of the hostility in the streets–maybe not a majority but a growing and ever-present significant population and a strong thread in Chinese culture. But when the government backs it with such rhetoric you have trouble–they are essentially giving the green light for all things xenophobic including car burning. Once again, don’t look behind the curtain…look at hose boogeyman–they are responsible for your problems–it cant be YOU.

  • un-think

    not the point–deflecting the issue. bad things happen everywhere-you cant blame foreigners for it. Chinese should take a long hard look at themselves and start punishing corruption, slave trafficking, earth destruction causing widespread cancers–tantamount to infanticide and genocide–clean up the damn water and air. People have right to breathe in any country.

  • un-think

    because fascism is on the rise in a ll countries–and with it always bigotry