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David Wertime

Chengdu's Police in Hot Pursuit of Love

Mothers, lock up your daughters! Or maybe that’s a job best left to a police force that netizens have described as “handsome” and “dreamy.”

On February 6, with Valentine’s Day around the corner, Chengdu’s Wuhou district police station released a series of posters on Weibo, China’s Twitter, profiling the single men on their rescue squad, entitled “The Plan To Rescue Single Police.” The Chinese internet portal mop.com (sorry, you’ll have to buy your actual mops elsewhere) picked it up, and China’s online ladies promptly began swooning. After the post was retweeted thousands of times, on February 8 the officers sat for an interview with Sina Weibo, which quickly became one of the hottest topics on the site.

Users took full advantage of the opportunity to submit questions and comments to the young men. @童謡de風景 demanded to know, “When will such an activity be held in Chongqing?” while @Candy-wait could apparently not wait, writing, “Aaaaaah! … I like No. 3, No. 3.” One lovelorn netizen, @越乡女, pleaded, “Although I live some place very far away,  if we have destiny [between us] perhaps it is a good thing if we get to understand each other a little.”

The posters profile five officers, all in their 20′s. They provide the officers’ Weibo handles, heights, weights, and one quote. For those on the proverbial lookout for a good man, officer No. 2, pictured below, is a traffic cop, 27 years old, standing 175 cm (about 5′ 9″) tall and weighing in at 65 kg (about 143 lbs). (No word on whether he owns his own apartment, although hopefully he possesses some sort of motor vehicle.) Officer No. 2 is quoted as saying, “I can’t change the world, but I can change the traffic outside the third ring road!” His Weibo handle is @暴走小神父, or “little runaway priest.” Something was definitely lost in translation.

The poster series is a rare public relations coup for Chinese authorities, which seemingly spend much of their time managing embarrassing news. Still, some netizens have said they believe a police station should stick to the serious stuff. To this sentiment, second-in-command Shi Yi told a Chongqing newspaper that he was, seriously, trying to help his employees “shed the single” (脱单), Chinese slang for finding a mate.

As of this article, there is no evidence any of the officers profiled have stopped looking for their better halves, although their Weibo accounts are rapidly filling with love letters. It’s a tough world out there for China’s single men, so readers interested in pursuing a mutual solution to singledom should check out the additional profiles here. Happy almost-Valentine’s Day from Tea Leaf Nation, and happy hunting.

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David Wertime

David is the co-founder and co-editor of Tea Leaf Nation. He first encountered China as a Peace Corps Volunteer in 2001 and has lived and worked in Fuling, Chongqing, Beijing, and Hong Kong. He is a ChinaFile fellow at the Asia Society and an associate fellow at the Truman National Security Project.
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  • Guest

    I’ll take number three, please!

  • Guest

    I’ll take number three, please!